HELP RAISE SOME DOUGH

$5.00 ($6.60 CANADIAN)

CLICK HERE TO FIND OUT HOW YOU CAN READ E-BOOKS ON A REGULAR LAPTOP/PERSONAL COMPUTER AS WELL AS ON TABLETS OR E-READERS.

Please click on the following preference to purchase The Men Who Killed Oates:

For KOBO

For the NOOK from BARNES & NOBLE

For KINDLE (U.S.)

For KINDLE (Canada)

For iBooks (APPLE)

For SCRIBD

From Smashwords

All funds raised through the sale of this e-book, will be used to support some needed living arrangements for our friend Barry Moores.  Barry was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS) over twenty years ago.  He lives in Newfoundland and his home is currently in need of some work.  One of the jobs would be the construction of a new deck.  We estimate the cost of a new deck to be $1500 and the goal of this project will be to raise $1000 for the project.  If 200 people purchase this book, then we will meet our goal.  Thanks for your support!

SOME REVIEWS!

This book is a dance of seven veils. The simple but suggestive prose takes the lives of seemingly unconnected ordinary people and tantalizes with their kinetic gyration of inevitability, tugging their paths closer and closer until Oates is thrillingly laid bare.

*
*
It was awesome!
A.M.
*
*
I loved it.  I was transported.
P.G.

 

Floyd moves the story through the last five decades of the 20th century, from Eastern Canada to Europe and into the Japanese countryside, smoothly, as if you were making these travels in space and time yourself.  Add to this a fascinating whodunit, set in a culturally-dynamic atmosphere, and at the end you will not only know about The Men Who Killed Oates, but you will also be rewarded with significant cultural knowledge of Eastern Canada’s history and the sweet texture of the Japanese landscape that can only be related from a person who has been there.

B.M.

 

I wanted to say how funny it is!

L.T.

 

Moores gives it 4/5 stars.

 

It’s a good read.

—Duncan’s wife

EA logo

NICKNAMES

Leo Boots reports:

Since we’re on the topic of the hometown:  last month, I was reading A.J.P. Taylor’s The Origins of the Second World War which is a study of European policy activity leading up to Germany’s invasion of Poland in 1939.  Mr. Taylor quoted the Mearns poem “Antigonish” to describe Western Europe’s attitude towards the (majority) German-populated but Polish city of Danzig (Gdansk):

Yesterday, upon the stair/I met a man who wasn’t there.

He was not there again today/I wish, I wish he’d go away…

It’s amazing how many times this poem has been referenced in the popular culture.  The most famous example is probably this: